Optical and Thermodynamic Relationships of an Emerging Class of Organic Phase Change Materials

Title:

Optical and Thermodynamic Relationships of an Emerging Class of Organic Phase Change Materials

Authors: Dale Clifford (School of Architecture, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, United States).
Issue: Vol 1, No 1 (2012)
Pages: 55-62
Section: Research Paper
DOI: 10.7492/IJAEC.2012.006
Citation: Dale Clifford (2012). "Optical and Thermodynamic Relationships of an Emerging Class of Organic Phase Change Materials." International Journal of Architecture, Engineering and Construction, 1(1), 55-62.
Publisher: International Association for Sustainable Development and Management (IASDM)
Abstract: Architects, building scientists and sustainability engineers are committed to lowering energy consumption and decreasing carbon footprint while increasing the qualitative human experience of the built environment. This paper summarizes a set of design prototypes that characterize the thermal and visual nature of an emerging class of organic phase change materials (PCMs) with high thermal storage density. A novel packaging system designed for liquid to solid phase transition is described that reveals the intrinsic qualities of PCM's by making nucleation and crystal growth patterns visual during transition. The current design extracts the PCM from its normative location within the wall section and positions the material as a separate element for application on the interior of curtain walls. It is envisioned that this application, in addition to providing effective thermal self-regulation and lowering the reliance on mechanical conditioning, can engender occupant behavioral change towards energy consumption. This argument is based on the connected domains of sensory pattern recognition, reasoning and decision-making as the sustainable technology is made visible. A case study is also presented with the quantitative energy results of PCM application.
Keywords: Thermal storage, phase change material, design, environment, social impact.
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